Wednesday, January 05, 2011

OU Law School New LL.M. Program

The University of Oklahoma Announces the John B. Turner LL.M. Program in Energy, Natural Resources and Indigenous Peoples

The John B. Turner LL.M Program extends the University of Oklahoma's long history of excellence and expertise in law relating to energy, natural resources, and American Indians and all indigenous peoples. The first class will enter the one-year program in late August 2011. For more information, including application forms, see http://www.law.ou.edu/llm.

Sustainable development of all forms of energy, water, and agricultural resources will continue to be challenging and vitally important to the global economy. Increasingly, development occurs on or near lands claimed by indigenous populations. While some native peoples may enjoy sovereign or quasi-sovereign rights to these lands, they often have little or no control, receive few benefits, and yet suffer the bulk of environmental and social problems that may arise. This program is designed to be flexible, allowing international and American students to study in all three areas or concentrate their studies in any one or two of these areas.

The John B. Turner LL.M. program offers a combination of courses available only at the University of Oklahoma. In addition to studying with the outstanding faculty at the College of Law, students have unique interdisciplinary opportunities to receive credit for related courses offered by other departments. The LL.M. program also includes guest lectures, field trips, and social and networking opportunities. The College of Law has one of the most favorable faculty-student ratios among law schools world-wide, so students will enjoy unsurpassed opportunities for close interaction with full-time faculty.

Legendary professors, including Richard Hemingway, Victor Kulp, Eugene Kuntz, Maurice Merrill, Joe Rarick, and Rennard Strickland have made the College of Law a national leader in energy, natural resources, and indigenous peoples. Professors who continue this tradition include Owen Anderson (oil and gas law, both domestic and international), Taiawagi Helton (environmental law and Indian natural resources law), Drew Kershen (water law, agricultural law, international bio-technology law), Peter Krug (international and comparative law), Emily Meazell (energy law), Joyce Palomar (land tenure security, real estate development and land use law), Lindsay Robertson (Indian law, indigenous peoples, human rights law), and Murray Tabb (environmental law). In addition, the College is fortunate to have several distinguished adjunct and visiting professors who teach highly specialized classes in this program area.

To earn an LL.M. degree, students are required to be present in residence at OU attending classes and must successfully complete 24 units of credit over two semesters of study, subject to possible extension for cause. All students must take 18 hours of courses (15 if they are approved by the LLM Committee for a thesis) in the areas of energy, natural resources, and indigenous peoples and the balance in approved electives. Most international students will be required to take a 1-credit class on American Legal Systems and a 1-credit class on Legal Research. For course information, see
http://jay.law.ou.edu/studentinfo/coursedescription/llmcourses.cfm

The University of Oklahoma College of Law is located on a beautiful bicycle-friendly campus centered in the heart of Norman, Oklahoma. Norman is located approximately 30 minutes from Will Rogers International Airport in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Norman is 180 miles north of Dallas, Texas. Norman was recently ranked #6 in terms of livability in a recent Money magazine survey. Nearby Oklahoma City, the state's Capital, was ranked America's most affordable city by Forbes magazine, which praised the metro area for its high quality of life.

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